A family’s dilemma: Part One

Part one of a two-part series.

What’s a family to do? Mom moves into a rehabilitation center (RC) for extra care after an illness. When her rehabilitation period is nearing its end, Mom is still not able to live independently so she cannot move back to her apartment in town and can no longer remain at the rehab location. She needs more care than the RC can provide so new accommodations need to be arranged, and the family only has a week in which to do so.

The problem is, Mom is in no shape to accompany her family members to research such options so her family lovingly takes over to facilitate the move. In their minds, they are extending a huge favor to their 88-year-old mother, and they most certainly are.

The family finds a top-notch adult family home (AFH) that has the capability of caring for the family’s mother both now and in the future, chooses furniture from Mom’s previous apartment that will fit into the smaller personal space she will have in the AFH, chooses a variety of clothing the family feels Mom will be happy with, they set everything up at the AFH and relocate Mom to her new home, and with smiles on their faces the family steps back and awaits the gratitude that will surely pour forth from Mom’s mouth.

But Mom isn’t happy, as a matter of fact, Mom is furious with her family’s choices. Even though Mom knew in advance that the family was doing all they could to make the move as pain-free and carefree as possible, she hadn’t been involved in any of the decisions so, in place of gratitude, she is resentful. Mom is well aware that she doesn’t have the ability to schlep around town to find a new home, nor does she have the ability to return to her apartment to painstakingly sift through all her clothing and furniture to choose exactly what she wants to be moved to the AFH, but she’s still mad as hell feeling she has been overlooked in the process.

In my novel, Requiem for the status quo, Colleen’s father, Patrick, is able-bodied but his cognitive health is somewhat diminished at the time due to Alzheimer’s disease. Patrick is still able to tour several memory care units with his adult children, however, and he makes the final decision on where he wants to live. There are other characters in my novel, however, who move into a memory care residence without the luxury of making such decisions. As those who have been in this particular situation know, that task is a fly by the seat of your pants, learn as you go endeavor that is rarely without drama and trauma for everyone involved. But as Maya Angelou once said, When you know better, you do better. It’s far too easy to judge the well-intentioned actions of others. Unless and until each of us has been put in the tenuous position of having to make quick long-term care decisions with little or no experience in doing so, those on the outside need to support those whose lives have become a whirlwind of forced decisions and resultant stress.

Part Two on this topic will address what might have been if the loved one is somehow included in the emergent tasks at hand. Hindsight is 20/20, but perhaps going forward, all of us will be a bit more prepared if such instances crop up in our lives. Hope to see you Thursday for the conclusion of this series.

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