Connection through stories

Stories can help us see no stranger. – Valarie Kaur

I recently listened to a TED talk wherein Valarie Kaur spoke of 3 Lessons of Revolutionary Love in a Time of Rage. She challenged me to find a connection in each face I meet along the way.

Five years after my father’s death from Alzheimer’s disease, I decided to share my family’s story so that others might find comfort in the commonality that exists from our shared stories. To be sure, with just under 6 million people in the United States diagnosed with the disease – and multitudes more globally – most of the world’s population has Alzheimer’s disease in common.

We don’t feel better that someone else has experienced or is experiencing this dreaded always-fatal disease, but we do find comfort in the fact that we are not alone. We can acknowledge that many walked this same path and came out on the other side; our active struggle will eventually come to an end.

After my father’s death in 2007, I was saturated in grief and happy to walk away from observing my father’s heart-rending decline. While gasping for breath through my tears, I also experienced a Phew! I’m glad that chapter of my life is over! 

Not so fast.

Not only was that chapter not over, but forty-four additional chapters begged to be written. And so I jumped back into the world of dementia because my journey had not ended – it had merely changed its direction. As I mentioned in an earlier post, My extraordinary success as an author, within months of publishing my first novel, Requiem for the status quo, I was able to celebrate the fact that others benefited from my work of love; people saw their story in mine and dared to hope they too would become a caregiver survivor, as did I.

In the twelve years since my father’s death, I can’t meet someone without Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia becoming front and center because Alzheimer’s is everywhere. I absolutely hate that so many of us have that story in common, but I am glad that we can connect with each other within the commonality of our shared experiences.

 

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